Category Archives: News

News related to cronic pain, new developments, medications

Human glycine receptor (GlyR)

Animal studies suggest that gene therapy might block tough-to-treat neuropathic pain.

In this study with rats, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh introduced the gene for part of the human glycine receptor (GlyR). This gene is found primarily on the surface of nerve cells in the spinal cord and the lower brain but not in the nerves in the limbs.

The researchers used an engineered herpes simplex virus (HSV) to deliver the gene into the paws of some rats, while other rats received only the HSV vector without the inserted gene. All the rats were then injected with an irritant that simulated symptoms of neuropathic pain, followed by injections of glycine to activate the GlyR receptor.

The glycine injection halted pain response in GlyR-HSV-treated rats but not in the rats that received only the HSV vector.

You are not Sick, you are Thirsty—Don’t treat thirst with Medications

College Station, Texas: After 12 years of clinical practice both in New York and Texas, Dr. Daniel Bettiol is hanging up his white coat forever to promote the healing benefits of proper body hydration.

Dr. Daniel Bettiol is leaving the profession of Chiropractic to pursue his clinically-tested belief that the primary causative factor in Headaches, Neck & Low Back pain is Dehydration of the tissues and the inability to eliminate accumulated Metabolic wastes from the body.

While treating over 3,500 patients and delivering over 120,000 chiropractic adjustments, Dr. Bettiol observed that over 90% of his patients were inadequately hydrated. “My most consistent finding was that 100% of my chronic Headache and Low Back patients were severely dehydrated. Many of these patients acknowledged an absolute disdain for drinking water,” says Dr. Bettiol. “For those patients who adopted my daily water regimen, an immediate decrease in pain symptomology was observed. That result was too consistent to be a coincidence.”

Dr. Bettiol is determined to continue the work of Fereydoon Batmanghelidj, M.D., who wrote the blockbuster 1992 best-seller, Your Body’s many cries for Water. Dr. Batmanghelidj died in 2005, but his signature slogan “You are not Sick, you are Thirsty—Don’t treat thirst with Medications” lives on. “Dr. Batmanghelidj warned the public back in the 1980s that America’s thirst for Soda, Coffee, and Sugar-filled drinks would create a huge population of unhealthy and obese people,” says Dr. Bettiol. “To say his prediction was accurate would be a gross understatement.”

Bettiol begins his new journey with the firm opinion that ALL water is not optimum for health. His extensive research has shown that Tap, Bottled, Charcoal-filtered, Distilled and Reverse Osmosis Water is NOT the ideal Water for long-term health and healing. “America has ignored the miraculous healing being experienced by the Koreans and Japanese with Ionized Alkaline Water,” says Bettiol. “Where Bill Gates vision was a computer in every home, my lifetime mission is to get an Alkaline Water Ionizer in every home throughout the world. That would not only eliminate obesity, chronic pain and the need for useless Medication, Surgery & Radiation…it would singlehandedly cut our annual $1.5 Trillion health care costs by 90%.”

“I would rather people spend more time with their families, their hobbies and the work they love, than sit in a doctor’s office for four hours waiting for a Doctor visit they really DON’T NEED.

Dr. Dan Bettiol
979-204-1794
texantuff@verizon.net

www.TruthAboutWaterHealing.com
www.AussieFreedomWater.blogspot.com

Studies Find Opioids Ineffective

“Opioids are often ineffective for some types of pain at any dose. Pain intensity scores were unchanged postoperatively in patients receiving titrated opioid analgesia in accordance with Agency for Health Care Policy and Research guidelines when compared with a matched control group before guideline implementation. None of our patients with chronic nonmalignant pain receiving opioids according to protocol had complete relief of pain.

Although opioids themselves may not cause addiction, the high prevalence of addiction in the general population and the even higher comorbidity of addictive disorders with psychiatric illness mean that a substantial minority of patients with chronic pain treated with opioids display problem behavior that makes opioid management arduous, if not impossible. The proportion of problem cases appears to be 10% to 15% of patients with chronic pain selected for opioid maintenance analgesia.

It is true that many patients do tolerate remarkably high daily doses of opioids and are able to function as well as before using the drugs. However, it is equally true that at least as many patients seem to be unable to tolerate any opioid at even the lowest dose. We must be respectful of the serious array of side effects of these agents. Tachyphylaxis and gradual adjustment of opioids may avoid respiratory arrest, but constipation, nausea, sedation, and confusion often become limiting adverse effects. ”

Links to articles and studies:

Opioids for chronic nonmalignant pain
Choosing suitable candidates for long-term therapy.

Systematic Review: Opioid Treatment for Chronic Back Pain: Prevalence, Efficacy, and Association with Addiction
Opioids are commonly prescribed for chronic back pain and may be efficacious for short-term pain relief. Long-term efficacy (≥16 weeks) is unclear. Substance use disorders are common in patients taking opioids for back pain, and aberrant medication-taking behaviors occur in up to 24% of cases.

Oxytrex – better than oxycodone?

Pain Therapeutics said it would start testing Oxytrex in the second half of 2007, enrolling into the “Extreme Study” about 120 patients who depend on large daily doses of oxycodone — or doses greater than or equal to 120 mg — to treat severe chronic pain, whom the company said are particularly prone to physical dependence and withdrawal.

There is reason to believe that Oxytrex will produce greater analgesia, while producing lower levels of tolerance and dependence, than oxycodone.


Pain Therapeutics website.

About Oxytrex from Pain Therapeutics, Inc.

“Oxytrex is a unique oral painkiller that preferentially inhibits an excitatory effect of opioid receptors. This excitatory effect is believed to counteract analgesia (pain relief) and cause tolerance. Its inhibition enhances pain relief and minimizes opioid tolerance. We believe Oxytrex represents the first new mechanism of action by an opiate drug since morphine was discovered over 100 years ago.

We are developing Oxytrex to treat moderate-to-severe chronic pain, such as osteoarthritic pain or low-back pain. We believe Oxytrex could be an effective substitute for oxycodone, a leading opioid painkiller, with U.S. sales of nearly $2 billion for the 12-months ending August 2005, according to IMS Health data.”

Waiting Appears Equal to Surgery

People with ruptured disks in their lower backs usually recover whether or not they have surgery, researchers are reporting. The study, a large trial, found that surgery appeared to relieve pain more quickly but that most people recovered eventually and that there was no harm in waiting.

And that, surgeons said, is likely to change medical practice.

The study, published Wednesday in The Journal of the American Medical Association, is the only large and rigorous randomized trial to compare surgery with waiting for sciatica.

The study was controversial from the start, with many surgeons saying they knew that the operation worked and that it would be unethical for their patients to participate.


continue reading on nytimes.com

more on American Medical Association from nytimes.com

High-tech distractions

August 2004 issue of Scientific American describes how pain of severe burns may be eased by the ultimate in high-tech distractions, virtual reality game.

Clinical studies are showing how effective virtual reality is at fighting burn pain. In an article in Scientific American, Hoffman described how they used a special virtual reality helmet that would work in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner to confirm this. The team studied five regions of the brain that are known to be associated with pain processing. “We found that all five regions showed significant reductions, and the amount of reductions during VR, the amount of reductions in pain-related brain activity, ranged from 50 percent to 97 percent,” says Hoffman. “The incoming pain signal is not even being processed during VR. There’s much less pain being processed by the brain when the person’s in VR.”


more on www.sciencentral.com

Related

Engadget is pointing us to the news that TV may also be something of a painkiller for kids. Basically, the researchers drew blood from a bunch of kids in various situations — and discovered that those who were watching TV found it less painful. Of course, this may not be all that surprising.