Regular Expression Syntax

. Matches any character

\( This marks the start of a region for tagging a match.

\) This marks the end of a tagged region.

\n Where n is 1 through 9 refers to the first through ninth
tagged region when replacing. For example, if the search
string was Fred\([1-9]\)XXX and the replace string was
Sam\1YYY, when applied to Fred2XXX this would generate
Sam2YYY.

\< This matches the start of a word. \> This matches the end of a word.

\x This allows you to use a character x that would otherwise
have a special meaning. For example, \[ would be interpreted
as [ and not as the start of a character set.

[…] This indicates a set of characters, for example, [abc] means
any of the characters a, b or c. You can also use ranges, for
example [a-z] for any lower case character.

[^…] The complement of the characters in the set. For example,
[^A-Za-z] means any character except an alphabetic character.

^ This matches the start of a line (unless used inside a set,
see above).

$ This matches the end of a line.

* This matches 0 or more times. For example, Sa*m matches Sm,
Sam, Saam, Saaam and so on.

+ This matches 1 or more times. For example, Sa+m matches Sam,
Saam, Saaam and so on.

—–> Examples (don’t use quotes)
– Quote lines: find “^” replace with “> ”
– Unquote lines: find “^> ” replace with “”
– Remove line numbers: find “^[0-9]+” replace with “”
– Convert tabs to double spaces: find “\t” replace with ” “

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